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Posts Tagged ‘Ansel Adams’

Landscape photography with my Canon 5D has opened up new doors. Primarily I have a true 17mm wide angld field of view. This came in handy when photographing the Rockies. Secondly, the resolution and low noise is great for those times when you don’t have your tripod ready. I always try and use a tripod, but its good to know you can crank up the ISO a little and still have a great file. I am consistently looking for new gear to better my abilities of capturing the best landscapes presented to me. Inevitably it boils down to the photographer and the lighting. That is why I am always trying to be out in the woods, more than I am already.

slideshow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157617691856079/show/

 

MT

 

Farm Creek Bliss Pano by you.

In Remembrance by you.

IMG_5893c by you.

As the Sun sets, the remaining light graces the prairie with a fantastic show of golden light. by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

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Here is a quick selection from Colorado. Here is a link to the slideshow that shows the rest of my images. Enjoy.

 

MT

 

 

Dream Lake Panorama by you.

Unrelenting by you.

Specular Light by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

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Going out with my trusty Canon 5D and L-series lenses, I was fortunate enough to snag some great landscape shots. I went to Peartle Springs, a park that is within a mile of my school. Immediately upon arriving I was bombarded by spectacular photo opportunities! I went to the lakes edge and began composing for the strongest compositions. Sometimes when I am presented with so many options simultaneously, I feel conflicted as to what subject matter I should photograph. I included a few of my favorites from the night. I am really trying to practice visualization as Ansel Adams was known for. I look at a scene and say to myself, what can I make this look like in a print.

Photographing the scene is only the beginning act. The most crucial step for me is to represent the image how I SAW IT. This inevitably means using tools in Photoshop as well other digital means to create my vision. Many will say that I am manipulating the image to something it was not. Not true. I am adjusting the image to what I imagined, saw, and felt. I can say that these High Dynamic Range images are a very close representation to what I witnessed. Much closer than what came straight from my camera. Another key point should be made. No one sees colors the exact same. Many lose this idea when viewing another persons images. Was the sky really that orange??? Well I dont know, what is considered orange to you? See, we must get out of the idea that we are all identical and that our images will reflect that notion. Our perceptions are different and therefore our art is different. Okay, now that I have that out of my system I will say good night.

 

Good night. 

MT

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Photographing landscapes has become a part of my life. I never walk, drive, or fly somewhere without thinking of the photographic opportunites. I feel that landscapes should simply be depictions of beauty and actuality. I strive to keep my photos representative of how I envisioned the scene. I am not afraid to use digital post processing, but as long as it does not deter the image from my initial sensory perceptions. I have enclosed some of my landscapes that I feel depict my visions. I have included a link to a flickr slideshow that displays my landscapes.

 http://flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157613300160860/show/

Over the years I became increasingly aware of the importance of visualization. The ability to anticipate  – to see in the mind’s eye, so to speak – the final print while viewing the subject makes it possible to apply the numerous controls of the craft in precise ways that contribute to achieving the desired result.”  – Ansel Adams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When shooting in Iowa this last weekend, I was surrounded by black and white photographic opportunities. There was enough snow to create harsh contrast, but not enough to create excessive contrast. The snow accentuates the textures and shapes in a landscape and especially a close up shot. A great characteristic of black and white photography is its innate ability to exhibit detail. Eliminating color is one less step our neural network must process when viewing an image.

BW Triptych

If you look closely at the image to the left, you can see every granule of snow and every speck of dirt. The middle image has excellent contrast between the shadows and the highlights, characteristic of black and white. The image to the right has examples of the previously mentioned traits of black and white. Why am I discussing this? I am pointing out in a round about way that snow is an excellent element for photographers, especially combined with black and white processing. The thing to remember with snow is that it is not easy to photograph in. When done right, it is great. But when done incorrectly, it can wreak havoc on our memories of how we saw the scene. Here are a few guidelines to follow.

1) Overexpose: You must remember that with any camera whether it be a piont and shoot or a DSLR, the internal meter attempts to create an overall equal exposure. In a more technical explanation, the camera tries to create an 18% grey exposure. We all know that snow is white, therefore grey is unnatural. In your menu settings there is a setting usually labled “EV compensation”. When shooting snow I would set this to +1.0 to start. Many modern point and shoots have built in modes including a snow mode. I would experiment with both.

2) Work the angles: With water in any form, there will be angles that display more or less relfectance. Use this to your advantage. You might be able to get some refraction images if you are lucky. In other words, colors refract all the time and its up to you to find them. Here is a little info on getting rainbow shots. Fun fact: rainbows are located 42 degrees off the axis of the sun.

3) Minimalism: Many of the best shots we see are ones that have a single subject and minimal distractions. Look for the single twig, or the lone tree on the horizon. Remember, with black and white the details really “pop”. Keep it simple and intimate and I know you will get some winners. This applies to any camera and any photographer.

Well, I hope this has helped at least one person. I will say one last thing: This last weekend in Iowa was a successful photographic trip for me. The main reason being that I was out searching for images for hours every day. Light is changing every second and therfore creating new opportunities constantly.

MT

P.S. Sorry that this not dicuss my Iowa trip in great detail, I had some things on my mind and now they are in words. Thanks.

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Moonrise Over Tecumseh

For all those that are not Ansel Adams aficionados, the name of this image is a play on one his images. Does anyone know which one?

Soon, I will be back in the woods and in the fields of Tecumseh. Only this weekend I will be shooting something with a little more impact. Does anyone know what it is? 😛 Anyways, this image is taken behind my grandparents house just before sunset. I enjoy sycamore trees because no matter the time of year, they always contrast well with surrounding nature. Enjoy.

MT

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Take a look at these images! Is this not such an inviting place? My photography buddy William, and I definately found it pleasing to the eye and to all the senses for that matter. This spot is located at Knob Knoster State Park. I call it ‘Red Rock Corner”. For those who have my book, you have seen this place before. The shale like rock is consistently changing colors; I believe it has something to do with the seasons and correlating weather. Anyhow, it is a great subject for photographing, and the variations make it a spot to frequent periodically throughout the year. It should be noted that if you look the other way as in the black and white image, you will be greeted with a reflection pool bordered with lovely sycamores. How great! Awesome subjects both ways. I could go on and on about this spot. I do want to leave some mystery though; afterall the viewer must do more than nonchalantly stare at the images to fully appreciate them.

MT

 

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