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Posts Tagged ‘Ansel Adams’

I have often said that the best photo opportunities are after a storm. Well today I proved myself right once again. The last two days hear in Warrensburg have been gloomy and somewhat chilly. Since I adamantlywatch the weather, I was prepared for this evenings clearing of the clouds. Around 5:30 I stepped outside of a school building and noticed a spot of blue through the clouds. I knew then, that the clouds were on their way out. I hustled to my car and drove to the near by park, Peartle Springs. I would have driven to my favorite spot, Knob Knoster State Park but I didn’t have the time. I quickly picked a spot to park and grabbed my tripod and bag and headed to the dam of one of the lakes at Peartle Springs. I was a little discouraged at first, the cloud cover was thick again. None the less I composed images, looking for intriguing lines and subjects. I got to test out my new lens I bought recently. Its an Olympus 28mm f/2.8 manual focus. If you are wondering how I used an Olympus lens on a Canon digital SLR, well you need to read this.  https://naturallycomposed.wordpress.com/mixing-the-old-with-the-new/   I like the manual functions for the reason that i have to think more about making my image. With auto focus, it is easy to never manually adjust your settings and hurry through the process of “making a photograph” as Ansel Adams would say.

Well, my patience payed off and I soon could see that the clouds were moving tremendously fast across the sky and that bright light was following it. I prepared for the burst of light that would soon expose itself. I knew it may only last a minute or maybe even less. I looked through my viewfinder, composing and exposing.  I saw how the Lilly pads created a diagonal line through my photo, leading the viewer on a journey through the water. I saw that the clouds were reflecting very nicely in the foreground. I watched and waited for the lower clouds to give way to the bright sky above….Waiting….Waiting….THERE! I pressed the shutter button and in a blink of an eye, the moment was captured. I knew it was the image I was waiting for.

The clouds soon covered the land again and the light faded. I was not discouraged. I had captured some good images and captured at least a few images that I would consider above the level of good. I am satisfied. I am tired. I have a mental image in my head, and an actual image on my screen. The day was a success.

MT

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I have recently been researching Ansel Adams’ photography and philosophy. It was interesting to learn that his photographs were almost all pre-visualized. He believed that you should take into consideration composition, color, tones, and detail all before exposing the film. He created the piece in his head and then on the film. One of his famous quotes was, “You do not take a photograph, you make it.” How true! You must visualize what you want in order to achieve your goal. I have tried to take this approach with my photography and do so more now that I see how it worked out for Ansel. You make the photograph. You reconstruct nature to what you see. Nature in itself is not art in technical terms, but the reorganization of elements in nature is art.

This image is one that I captured while fishing near Kansas City. How simple but so refined. I reconstructed the scene to evoke a sense of calm and subtle geometry. The blue gives you a smooth and easy retinal stimulation, while the individual stems give the image a sense of solidity. Only the necessary went into the image. No more, no less. Maybe a weak example of the previous paragraphs topic. None the less, it was my reconstruction. What would you have done?

MT

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