Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘water’

In no particular order is a collection of my best work from the spring semester. I hope you enjoy and check out my slide show on flickr for more images.

MT

http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157617798905004/show/

Ice Crystal Sunrise by you.

Pierced Halo by you.

The Old Forest by you.

Climax by you.

As the Sun sets, the remaining light graces the prairie with a fantastic show of golden light. by you.

Farm Creek Bliss Pano by you.

Turmoil on the Horizon by you.

Cool Colors by you.

Loess Hills Barn by you.

Looking Up at the Future by you.

First night of star trails by you.

Goodbye Colorado by you.

Sky Jack by you.

No Contest by you.

On the Edge by you.

Central Missouri Speedway by you.

Missouri Trust Company: Sedalia, MO by you.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Read Full Post »

Landscape photography with my Canon 5D has opened up new doors. Primarily I have a true 17mm wide angld field of view. This came in handy when photographing the Rockies. Secondly, the resolution and low noise is great for those times when you don’t have your tripod ready. I always try and use a tripod, but its good to know you can crank up the ISO a little and still have a great file. I am consistently looking for new gear to better my abilities of capturing the best landscapes presented to me. Inevitably it boils down to the photographer and the lighting. That is why I am always trying to be out in the woods, more than I am already.

slideshow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157617691856079/show/

 

MT

 

Farm Creek Bliss Pano by you.

In Remembrance by you.

IMG_5893c by you.

As the Sun sets, the remaining light graces the prairie with a fantastic show of golden light. by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

Read Full Post »

Fly fishing in the Ozarks is an awesome experience. With the clear, swift, and beautiful trout streams combined with the steep bluffs, crystal clear water, and the wildlife that abounds on the lakes, there is nothing better.

Recently I went with a good fly fishing friend to the North Fork of the White River in the pursuit of a good time and good fishing. We were successful at both. The trout fishing was awesome! I caught over 30 fish that day, while Kevin caught the largest fish: an eighteen inch Brown trout. After a day of fishing the river, we decided to head to the lake for some warm water fish. Taking my Dad along was a good idea since he was most successful and provided a dinner of fillets. White bass, small mouth bass, Kentucky bass, and walleye were among the species caught that outing. Below are some photos that I found especially good. Click on the link to see all the images from the weekend in a slide show.  http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157616427517998/show/

 

MT

 

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Read Full Post »

This week for Creative Photography, we had to shoot panoramic images. I have been doing panos for awhile now and continue to love them. I sometimes think back and wish I had done more in a particular area. Not only do yo uget a wider field of view, but you also get a huge file with tons of detail. My Canon 5D has opened up my abilites even more in regards to quality.

My technique for panoramas varues depending on the situation. I try and shoot vertically which allows for higher resolution, but this is not always the case. I find that I line the images more level when hand holding than I do when using my tripod. There is an apparatus that is specifically used for making panos, but it is very specialized and expensive. I of course shoot RAW, and the lowest ISO that is acceptable.

The images below are a mixture of all the above mentioned techniques. Hope you enjoy!

MT

 

UCM Stadium

The Old Forest

Read Full Post »

I have to say that I am quite fortunate sometimes.

Today, as  I was driving through Peartle Springs I envisioned a photo opportunity  immediately. The image I saw turned out to be of a lady named Valerie. She is 82 years old and has been a fisher-woman since she was twelve. Originally from Kansas City, she has since moved to the more quiet town of Warrensburg. Valerie fishes at Peartle Springs on a regular basis; I have actually seen her before. Today the lighting was just right for making her image. Her face has such character and when she speaks that character comes out. I sat next to Valerie for close to an hour, talking only when I felt it necessary. She was confident and had a sharp sense of humor. I was enthralled by her personality, she seemed to know why I was there and didn’t mind. Normally when approaching someone with a camera and asking for a portrait I feel uneasy. Valerie was one step ahead of me. I walked up and no sooner had I opened my mouth to speak did she say, “The last man that took my picture made me look ninety-two.” I was sort of stunned. She knew why I was there. After thinking for a minute I said, “No ninety-two year old could cast that far”. We were friends with each other after that.

I feel that I am being led in other directions than I initially thought. Maybe I am supposed to connect with these people. I think I am going to pursue portraits more than I originally thought I would. I feel something completely different when photographing a person compared to a landscape. When I stop to photograph a landscape, I feel in control. I have this sense of weakness when photographing people, but not in a bad way. I feel that they are dictating my actions. I am only recording what they give me. I enjoy it. When I finally get to the point that I feel like I know this person, the image has already been taken.

MT 

Valerie

Read Full Post »

Going out with my trusty Canon 5D and L-series lenses, I was fortunate enough to snag some great landscape shots. I went to Peartle Springs, a park that is within a mile of my school. Immediately upon arriving I was bombarded by spectacular photo opportunities! I went to the lakes edge and began composing for the strongest compositions. Sometimes when I am presented with so many options simultaneously, I feel conflicted as to what subject matter I should photograph. I included a few of my favorites from the night. I am really trying to practice visualization as Ansel Adams was known for. I look at a scene and say to myself, what can I make this look like in a print.

Photographing the scene is only the beginning act. The most crucial step for me is to represent the image how I SAW IT. This inevitably means using tools in Photoshop as well other digital means to create my vision. Many will say that I am manipulating the image to something it was not. Not true. I am adjusting the image to what I imagined, saw, and felt. I can say that these High Dynamic Range images are a very close representation to what I witnessed. Much closer than what came straight from my camera. Another key point should be made. No one sees colors the exact same. Many lose this idea when viewing another persons images. Was the sky really that orange??? Well I dont know, what is considered orange to you? See, we must get out of the idea that we are all identical and that our images will reflect that notion. Our perceptions are different and therefore our art is different. Okay, now that I have that out of my system I will say good night.

 

Good night. 

MT

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »