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Posts Tagged ‘Wildlife’

Landscape photography with my Canon 5D has opened up new doors. Primarily I have a true 17mm wide angld field of view. This came in handy when photographing the Rockies. Secondly, the resolution and low noise is great for those times when you don’t have your tripod ready. I always try and use a tripod, but its good to know you can crank up the ISO a little and still have a great file. I am consistently looking for new gear to better my abilities of capturing the best landscapes presented to me. Inevitably it boils down to the photographer and the lighting. That is why I am always trying to be out in the woods, more than I am already.

slideshow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157617691856079/show/

 

MT

 

Farm Creek Bliss Pano by you.

In Remembrance by you.

IMG_5893c by you.

As the Sun sets, the remaining light graces the prairie with a fantastic show of golden light. by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

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It may seem strange, but some of my favorite images lately have been out of focus. Let me clarify. I have methodically selected certain lenses and purposefully thrown the image out of focus. The result, a nice painterly image with vibrant hues and intriguing shapes. I have never learned how to paint, so  I feel this will be as close as I come.

slideshow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157617396714515/show/

MT

 Getting out of class early led to a nice leisurely afternoon of out of focus image making. by you.

Creative Photography: Nothing Sharp by you.

Creative Photography: Nothing Sharp by you.

Creative Photography: Nothing Sharp by you.

Creative Photography: Nothing Sharp by you.

Creative Photography: Nothing Sharp by you.

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Fly fishing in the Ozarks is an awesome experience. With the clear, swift, and beautiful trout streams combined with the steep bluffs, crystal clear water, and the wildlife that abounds on the lakes, there is nothing better.

Recently I went with a good fly fishing friend to the North Fork of the White River in the pursuit of a good time and good fishing. We were successful at both. The trout fishing was awesome! I caught over 30 fish that day, while Kevin caught the largest fish: an eighteen inch Brown trout. After a day of fishing the river, we decided to head to the lake for some warm water fish. Taking my Dad along was a good idea since he was most successful and provided a dinner of fillets. White bass, small mouth bass, Kentucky bass, and walleye were among the species caught that outing. Below are some photos that I found especially good. Click on the link to see all the images from the weekend in a slide show.  http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157616427517998/show/

 

MT

 

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

Ozark Fly Fishing by you.

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Here is a quick selection from Colorado. Here is a link to the slideshow that shows the rest of my images. Enjoy.

 

MT

 

 

Dream Lake Panorama by you.

Unrelenting by you.

Specular Light by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

Black and White Panorama by you.

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This week for Creative Photography, we had to shoot panoramic images. I have been doing panos for awhile now and continue to love them. I sometimes think back and wish I had done more in a particular area. Not only do yo uget a wider field of view, but you also get a huge file with tons of detail. My Canon 5D has opened up my abilites even more in regards to quality.

My technique for panoramas varues depending on the situation. I try and shoot vertically which allows for higher resolution, but this is not always the case. I find that I line the images more level when hand holding than I do when using my tripod. There is an apparatus that is specifically used for making panos, but it is very specialized and expensive. I of course shoot RAW, and the lowest ISO that is acceptable.

The images below are a mixture of all the above mentioned techniques. Hope you enjoy!

MT

 

UCM Stadium

The Old Forest

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Photographing landscapes has become a part of my life. I never walk, drive, or fly somewhere without thinking of the photographic opportunites. I feel that landscapes should simply be depictions of beauty and actuality. I strive to keep my photos representative of how I envisioned the scene. I am not afraid to use digital post processing, but as long as it does not deter the image from my initial sensory perceptions. I have enclosed some of my landscapes that I feel depict my visions. I have included a link to a flickr slideshow that displays my landscapes.

 http://flickr.com/photos/matthewsphotography/sets/72157613300160860/show/

Over the years I became increasingly aware of the importance of visualization. The ability to anticipate  – to see in the mind’s eye, so to speak – the final print while viewing the subject makes it possible to apply the numerous controls of the craft in precise ways that contribute to achieving the desired result.”  – Ansel Adams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Going out a second time to Knob Knoster turned out to be productive once again. I went out yesterday morning and snagged this HDR image of the sunrise. I love taking photos of the sun shining through the tree tops. Something about the emotions it can evoke always has interested me. I was going to go out this morning but the weather was less than pleasing. I don’t mind cold and I don’t mind snow but when it is cold and there is no snow as well as no interesting sky, I seem to value sleep more. So I sip my Espresso blend coffee and enjoy the climate controlled environment.

Check out my new page I added last night. Click here to see what gear I use. Also, you should see my latest photos on flickr. I apologize, but many of the images are also seen here on naturallycomposed. This is done so that when you click on the image, you are sent in a separate window to flickr. If you experience any problems on my site, please notify me so I can fix them. Have a good day.

MT

Knob Knoster Day 2

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This morning I traveled the short distance to Knob Knoster State Park. I was fortunate enough to have beautiful clouds and lighting. Instead of writing in past tense about my expedition this morning, I will share excerpts from my journal. I hope you like it.

            “…Beautiful. I think to take a picture, even though it won’t compare. How can it? The viewer won’t feel the slipping ice or the wind down their back. They wont see the leaves frozen in time. Why do I try then?…”

The Lounge Chair

          “…The wind hits my journal and passes on to the shuttering leaves. Glowing like ambers of a fire, the leaves vacillate on their branches. The air is brisk and cool. Each gust cools my fingers ever so slightly. I sit at the base of a tree I dubbed “The Lounge Chair…”

To My Left

          “…To my left is the lake. I watch as dozens of dried and frozen leaves slide their way along the ice….It seems I am perched on a peninsula that contains the right formula of earthly elements to create a vast area of moss. Even in the dead of winter, the moss contains pigments of green. I pause a moment to capture an image…”

Opening My Eyes

          “…I don’t want to go. I don’t want the trees to think I am not loyal. I love them, I really do. I will stay a little longer. I close my eyes and ease my head back against the tree. It has been a magnificent morning I cannot forget. I will not let myself forget…”

 

MT

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When shooting in Iowa this last weekend, I was surrounded by black and white photographic opportunities. There was enough snow to create harsh contrast, but not enough to create excessive contrast. The snow accentuates the textures and shapes in a landscape and especially a close up shot. A great characteristic of black and white photography is its innate ability to exhibit detail. Eliminating color is one less step our neural network must process when viewing an image.

BW Triptych

If you look closely at the image to the left, you can see every granule of snow and every speck of dirt. The middle image has excellent contrast between the shadows and the highlights, characteristic of black and white. The image to the right has examples of the previously mentioned traits of black and white. Why am I discussing this? I am pointing out in a round about way that snow is an excellent element for photographers, especially combined with black and white processing. The thing to remember with snow is that it is not easy to photograph in. When done right, it is great. But when done incorrectly, it can wreak havoc on our memories of how we saw the scene. Here are a few guidelines to follow.

1) Overexpose: You must remember that with any camera whether it be a piont and shoot or a DSLR, the internal meter attempts to create an overall equal exposure. In a more technical explanation, the camera tries to create an 18% grey exposure. We all know that snow is white, therefore grey is unnatural. In your menu settings there is a setting usually labled “EV compensation”. When shooting snow I would set this to +1.0 to start. Many modern point and shoots have built in modes including a snow mode. I would experiment with both.

2) Work the angles: With water in any form, there will be angles that display more or less relfectance. Use this to your advantage. You might be able to get some refraction images if you are lucky. In other words, colors refract all the time and its up to you to find them. Here is a little info on getting rainbow shots. Fun fact: rainbows are located 42 degrees off the axis of the sun.

3) Minimalism: Many of the best shots we see are ones that have a single subject and minimal distractions. Look for the single twig, or the lone tree on the horizon. Remember, with black and white the details really “pop”. Keep it simple and intimate and I know you will get some winners. This applies to any camera and any photographer.

Well, I hope this has helped at least one person. I will say one last thing: This last weekend in Iowa was a successful photographic trip for me. The main reason being that I was out searching for images for hours every day. Light is changing every second and therfore creating new opportunities constantly.

MT

P.S. Sorry that this not dicuss my Iowa trip in great detail, I had some things on my mind and now they are in words. Thanks.

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A night of cityscape photos  in Omaha and a day of shooting landscapes in the Loess Hills has produced some excellent images with my Canon 5D. When coming to Iowa I imagined cornfields and the occasional cow. I have come away with a completely different outlook. I am thoroughly thrilled with the images I have captured.

Starting in chronological order of capture is Omaha, NE. After a pleasant dinner at the Old Chicago Restaurant I took to the streets for some urban landscapes. Using my 5D I have become a firm believer in full frame sensor and its incredible image quality. Bracketing exposures of up to 30 seconds, I was able to capture detail throughout the cityscape. Using High Dynamic Range Photo to process these images enabled stunning color and detail. Omaha is a pleasant town, or at least the Old Market area I visited. I would compare the Old Market as a smaller version of the Plaza in Kansas City. Conversing with the homeless people while capturing the city lights brought some humor to an otherwise cool night.

Omaha Cityscape 

Second photo is of an old dilapidated gas station named “Stuckeys”. I hear from the locals that this was once a bustling place to stop by, but due to various reasons it has since went under. None the less, I captivated on the stores demise. I enjoy studying these broken down buildings for numerous reasons. They provide wonderful textures, colors, and shapes mainly. When photographing these areas, I am always aware of my surroundings because it is not uncommon for another curious individual to come along.

Stuckey's

The last image is what most people that know me would say epitomizes my photography: outdoor scenics. I love this image for the pure fact that it is exactly how I saw this in real life. Minus the feeling of the outdoor elements, this image depicts the colors and texture I saw standing there. This was captured in the Loess Hills State Park. Driving along, this barn instantly stuck out as a photographic opportunity. A combination of the diffused light and the blue sky causes the barn to look ominous yet warm. I captured numerous images around the barn, but I feel this is one of the strongest compositions. I may post more from this spot when I get the time to process the rest of my images.

Loess Hills Barn

The day was great! While the wind was brisk, the sun was warm. I have over 500 images to process, therefore there may be quite a few more posts from Iowa. I hope you enjoy. Remember you must only be slightly more aware than the average person, to see the extraordinary beauty. 

MT

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